In Life, its not where you go, it’s who you travel with. We leave the drama and attentions seekers to their own little groups and enjoy life with people with goals and an appetite for adventure.

June 30, 2017

TEEWAH BEACH, QLD AUSTRALIA

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This magical stretch of beach close to Brisbane is known for its accessibility to anyone with a 4X4 – including nervous mums and Vespa-riding teens
Where else can you dodge sandcastles, watch whales and get bogged in the sand all in the same day. Teewah Beach in Queensland, Australia, stretches for over 40 miles, with the Pacific Ocean crashing on one side and multi-coloured dune formations towering on the other. Most normal roads don't tend to have kids with buckets and spades digging holes in the middle of them


For all the reasons above, Teewah Beach is our go-to magic spot. It’s an easy two-hour drive north of Brisbane up the Bruce Highway and once over the Noosa River Ferry, within minutes you’re looking out over the southern end of Teewah and the beginnings of the Great Sandy National Park..
Teewah Beach extends from Double Island Point in Cooloola, Gympie Region through Noosa North Shore in the Shire of Noosa to the Noosa River in Queensland, Australia. It is part of the Great Sandy National Park.


For much of its length it is a designated road under Queensland government legislation. It is subject to the same laws governing speeding, drink driving and wearing a seatbelt. For 4WD enthusiasts, the beach provides an access way to Rainbow Beach and Fraser Island.



But as locals know, the use of the beach by 4WD enthusiasts is a contentious issue. Many environmentalists see the 4WD car as a factor in the degradation of beach eco-systems. Others see it as their only means of experiencing a wilderness area and good fishing. Road safety issues remain a concern, however, with numerous accidents and fatalities each season, many involving tourists who are not accustomed to the hazards of driving on a beach.


One of the most spectacular views comeS from the Teewah Coloured Sands - a stretch of sand cliffs along Teewah Beach within Noosa North Shore. The cliffs are up to 200 metres in height and the sand is in a range of colours, created through natural combinations of iron oxide and vegetable dyes.

The Leisha Track connects the Rainbow Beach side to the Teewah Beach side and is often tricky to access with overhanging sticks impeding entry. Tides play a vital role in enabling movement along this stretch and as a general rule sightseers should plan their travel no later than 2 hours either side of low tide.







June 23, 2017

RED BEACH, BRIBIE ISLAND

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We are so fortunate to live 30 minutes to Bribie Island where there are not just one but two designated dog beaches. If you are looking for a off leash dog beach, look no further than Bribie Island. With designated dog parks and beaches, including off-leash areas, Bribie Island has plenty of spaces that cater to dogs and their human owners alike.

Our favorite’s is the beach from Red Beach car park around to Woody Bay, Woorim. This fantastic stretch of surf beach is but part of the entire dog friendly southern coastline of Bribie Island, which runs all the way from here around to Red Beach Bongaree.


Although a bit narrow at high tide, at low tide there’s plenty of running and digging space for all concerned. There’s a convenient car park nearby on Bennelong St, from which the short path leads straight into the midst of 4-legged action. Intrepid owners and leash-free pets can from here hike the 3-4 km distance via Woody Bay all the way through wild scrubby beachfront to the calmer waters of Bongaree.





History buffs may be interested in the relics of Woorim Beach’s time as a strategic Pacific defence site in World War II that are dotted at various spots along the beachfront on the other side of the patrolled area. The nearest of these is the naval defence Indicator Loop hut at the far end of North St and in the picnic grounds nearby one of its squat concrete power huts that many a picnicker has mistaken for a toilet block.



June 18, 2017

LONGREACH, QUEENSLAND OUTBACK. THINGS TO DO.

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Longreach is a small town of about 4,200 people in central western Queensland.  The drive is about 12.5 hours from Brisbane and is completely on tar sealed roads. The outback town of Longreach, Australia gained its name after its positioning on the ‘long reach’ of the Thomson River.



The friendly outback town makes for an excellent holiday destination or stopping point on your Queensland road trip. You’ll find natural beauty as well as fascinating tourist attractions in this friendly town, where you can experience life in the Aussie outback and learn about the region’s important role in Australian history.


Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame.

First stop on your list will be the Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame which pays tribute to Australia’s pioneering legends and outlines our Outback history. There are six galleries to explore in the Hall of Fame, starting with a short video of interviews with different stockmen in the Longreach region (including women, Aboriginal, and young stockmen too).  This helps set the scene to learn about the rich history of outback families and to consider the changing reality for stockmen today. 



Remember to join experienced Head Stockman John Hawkes for an informative insight and tribute to the skills of all stockmen past and present. Horse Kenny and Olly the Steer are but a small part of the lunch and night show of horsemanship and the showcasing of traditional Australian Stockman skills that are still used today. You’ll be entertained, captivated and leave having a sense of pride in being a part of keeping the spirit of the outback alive.





Qantas Founders Museum

The award-winning museum tells the story of Qantas Airways through interpretive displays, interactive exhibits, aircraft and an impressive collection of artefacts. If you’ve ever wanted to see inside a heritage hangar, explore a Boeing 747 and 707, go inside the cockpit, learn how to ‘arm the doors’, see the black box recorder, go inside a luxury jet, fly a fighter plane simulator, or walk on the wing of an aircraft, then the Qantas Founders Museum is for you.




Cruises & Outback Shows





We loved the Outback Pioneers Cruise Experience which was an evening on the Thomson River complete with entertainment by Heartland Theatre. Heartland Theatre is the Outback’s premiere musical experience and a unique evening’s entertainment with a intimate candlelit bush dinner.  Award winning yet humble local musicians entertained all with the personalized combination of songs, bush poems and jokes while we enjoyed a country home cooked style meal.




Camden Park Station Tour

We got to meet the Walker family on their property as you experience a working sheep and cattle station. We meet Outback Dan, fifth generation farmer, who will guide us through his family’s historical homestead, cattle yards, shearing shed and took us for a walk down the “Queen’s Path”, in honour of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip’s 1970 visit. We waked through the historical Homestead Gardens, Shearing Shed and Cattle Yards then tour the farm after a scrumptious smoko.




Kinnon & Co





Cobb and Co were the pioneers of stagecoach travel and mail services throughout Australia. On their Cobb & Co Stagecoach Experience we traveled in a restored stagecoach on their award-winning tour – first at a leisurely pace through town and then full-tilt along a stretch of the original Longreach-Windorah mail route. You get to hear the pounding hooves of the magnificent horses on the outback dirt road. Hear the rattle and creak of the coach. Hold on to your hat for the only stagecoach gallop in Australia! It’s exhilarating. It’s entertaining. And it’s the closest you can get to feeling what it would have been like in the pioneer past. After the 45 minute stagecoach ride and photos, we slowed down with a traditional smoko (the original Aussie tea break), a classic 

Australian movie in retro cinema seats for the Harry Redford Old Time Tent Show, which has fun for all the family in a tribute to the old travelling shows.






First and foremost, when travelling in Outback Queensland you are asked to please acknowledge and respect the values and beliefs of Indigenous Australians as they have a long standing view that the landscape is the very core of all spirituality!

Road hazards such as livestock (think city traffic jam), long distances on flat terrain can take some getting used to.  This goes without saying, but OBEY the speed limit – it’s there for a reason.

While travelling on the major highways, fuel stops are rarely more than 200km apart, so it may not be necessary to carry spare fuel...but if you happen to come across a “no fuel” sign...that's exactly what it means.  Ensure you always travel with extra water, first aid kit, spares for tyres (with the correct pressure), radiator hoses, fan belts and not to mention a good tool kit!
When driving in the Outback be mindful you are sharing the space with our stock, kangaroo and emu friends.  Kangaroos tend to be more active during sunrise and sunset (so stay vigilant).


Check the mobile coverage areas while planning your trip.  Both Telstra and Optus networks are covered in Longreach, Mount Isa, Charleville and Birdsville(Telstra Next G network will still be available within a 20km radius of most other towns), but you will find limited coverage in the far South West corner of Queensland.  If you're planning that Outback adventure, then perhaps invest in a satellite phone.






June 02, 2017

HIGHLIGHT OF NT, Litchfield National Park. DARWIN, AUSTRALIA

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Litchfield National Park


Litchfield National Park is located in the Northern Territory of Australia. Litchfield, or Litchy as it is affectionately known, is a gorgeous natural wonderland set in the outback, about 130kms away from Darwin. Patches of monsoon rainforest thrive in the deep, narrow gorges created over thousands of years. Wildlife such as wallabies and birds flourish in the Park and can often be seen while travelling through. Gigantic termite mounds stand up to 6 meters tall, others grow in a north-south orientation, acting as a built in temperature controlled micro environment.




Litchfield is probably most famous for its spring fed waterfalls which flow all year round. Below the cascading waterfalls of the sandstone plateau are crystal-clear swimming holes lined with pandanas palms and paper bark trees. These are great places to escape the heat and take in the area by swimming and snorkeling.

Buley Rockhole and Florence Falls are undoubtedly Litchfield’s most visited swimming spots as they are easily accessed by short walks through monsoonal forest and are basically open all year round for swimming.

Given the distance, you will need a car to get there, or failing that, you could jump on one of the tours that visit regularly. Another important aspect is that the Territory runs on two seasons – the wet and the dry . If you are planning a visit, then you are going to want to visit in the dry season (April/May – September/October) which is when the Territory comes alive! Litchfield is closed in the wet season so that is yet another reason to visit in the dry. With multiple waterfalls, camping areas, hikes and 4WD tracks there is so much to see here at the park.



We parked at Florence Falls and walked up the path to Buley Rockhole, stopping at some of the quieter water spots to cool off along the way. As you follow the path, just look out for the posts which will lead you into these quieter spots. We took our time and explored each little area. After a quick swim at the Buley Rockhole, which is one of the more popular swimming areas, we ventured back down the path and took the stairs down to Florence Falls.






There is a great lookout before the stairs which gives a stunning vantage point of the water wonderland that you are about to swim in.


Florence Falls was magical! We got straight into the cool, clear waters enjoying the beauty of the waterfalls in front of us – and we weren’t the only ones. Swimming with us were locals and travelers alike all laughing, taking photos and enjoying their time in the water.





Last stop for the morning was Wangi Falls, and based on the number of people there the most popular, which quite deserves as they are really quite stunning.  This is also a popular swimming spot with plenty of groups setting up for the day as there are nice lawns and bbq’s at the entrance.




Driving around the National Park there are certainly no shortages of warnings to only swim in the designated spots due to crocodiles. Every little creek crossing on the roads had crocodile warning signs..






The next day we decided to hit the 4WD tracks around Litchfield and our first stop was the Lost City. We got there around 9am and we were the only ones there which were quite surprising for Litchfield, and even better people only started arriving as we were driving out.  There is a very easy loop walk of around 500 metres that takes you through the rock formations and it does look like a Lost City with mini sky scrapers and buildings toppled over.





From here we drove down to the Blyth Homestead, an outstation that was established in 1928. Inside there is a good storybook of the family, outlining the hardships they faced back in those days.  It really makes you realize how easy our lives are compared to how these people used to live. From there was a  short drive down to the termite mounds.




We definitely recommend a visit to the Litchfield National Park if you are visiting Darwin, pack a lunch and enjoy the day exploring. You will not regret it!







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